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Fall Registration Open

Rock Journal

Greetings New England!

We have GREAT programs coming up for you … and spots are filling fast, so register right away! It’s going to be a gorgeous Autumn at the Hollow and our excited, vibrant and creative staff are gearing up for a bountiful season chock-full of wonder. Below are our brief descriptions of what emphasis each course takes. As always, don’t hesitate to contact us with any questions you may have.

Times: 9 am – 3 pm

Dates: September 15 – November 20, December potential.

TUES.
Wilderness Skills
Ages: 12-17
Emphasis: Pioneer and Native American life and history, primitive skills & tools, fire making, shelter skills, survival methods, stalking and camouflage, teamwork, plants and animals, tracking. (Oh but that hardly covers it all!)

Explorers – CANCELLED
Ages 7-11.
Lots of exploring! Navigation/maps, hiking, collecting, games, identification, tracking, animal stalking, and creative learning and team initiatives. A bit of everything.

THURS
Wilderness Challenge **FULL**
Ages: 12-17
Emphasis: Physical challenges, survival skills and first aid, teamwork initiatives, navigation, wild food and water, tracking, shelters. Our more advanced outdoor adventure course.

Scouts
Ages: 7-9
Emphasis: Foundational nature skills, habitats, weather, story, history, plant and animal studies, eco-games, nature projects, awareness, and more.

Pioneers **One Space Open**
Ages 9-12
Emphasis: Intermediate Nature skills and discovery; building projects, eco-games, teamwork, camouflage, tracking, awareness skills, traditions, storytelling.

FRIDAY

Micro-Scouts *FULL*
Ages 4-6
Emphasis: Observations, eco-games, nature art, collecting and sorting, examining and inquiry, hiking, weather, story, animals and plants.

Jr. Naturalist **FULL**
Ages 7-14
Emphasis: Observational skills, botany and herbal medicine making, animal/nature symbiosis, eco-games, nature journals, field skills, tracking, birdwatching, Earth science, and some primitive skills.
Registration Forms

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GH Burdock

GREAT HOLLOW WILDERNESS SCHOOL

OFFERS A FAMILY HIKE

WITH LOCAL HERBALIST, SAT., JUNE 27

Have you ever wondered as you’ve hiked through the woods which plants were edible or which plants would be just the thing to rub on an itchy poison ivy rash?

Well, the summer reading program, ONE BOOK ONE LAKE, is co-sponsoring a family hike on Saturday, June 27 at 9 a.m. that will highlight wild plants for food and medicine. Great Hollow Wilderness School, the regional YMCA, located at 225 Route 37 in New Fairfield is co-sponsoring the hike on its 896 acre property.

Ananda Wilson, the Whole Earth Home School Director at the Great Hollow Wilderness School in New Fairfield will be leading this informative two-three hour family hike. A second generation backyard herbalist, Ms. Wilson informs: “We will get up close and personal with some of the abundant local plants which have provided Native Americans with food and medicine for centuries. We’ll hike along some of the most scenic areas of the property and take note of the incredible biodiversity.

With wilderness and farms vanishing at an alarming rate, the 896 acres of protected land at Great Hollow proves to be a goldmine of natural history and a place of hope for a sustainable future…Among the canopy of hemlocks along the rushing river, we may find some endangered species to admire, or we may find a glorious stand of wild bee balm in the meadow, known for it’s gentle yet potent anti-viral action as a tea and spice in place of oregano.”

Great Hollow is the oldest non-profit outdoor education program in Connecticut and has been creating and managing change trough experimental education for over 35 years. With strong foundations in adventure programming, leadership, development, and diversity education to Upward Bound and other school-based/educational opportunity programs, Great Hollow also has expanded to natural awareness and primitive programs, camps for children with specific educational needs, freshman college orientations, and home school programs.

Register for this upcoming Great Hollow hike by calling the school: 203-746-5852. Please bring plenty of water and note this outing is not handicapped accessible. For more program details, go to www.onebookonelake.org.

(Article arranged and co-written by Suzi Mitchell)

Greetings!

Below is the link for the Whole Earth Homeschool Programs registration form for what we are offering this summer, 2009.

Please note that we are offering an Herbal Intensive for adults!

Questions? Feel free to contact us.

SUMMER REGISTRATION FORM

SUMMER PROGRAMS 2009

Lepidoptera! For wilderness enthusiasts ages 6-8. We’ll be seeking and exploring all different sides of nature, from insects and mammals, rocks and minerals, plants, water, and anything else that strikes our curiosity! A full day out in nature gives students a chance to try their hand at fire skills, teamwork, and will offer lots of play and exercise.
Lepidoptera: Tuesdays, Session one: June 23-July 14 Session two: July 21-August 11

Explorers: For nature enthusiasts ages 9-11. We will look a little deeper into the hows and whys of nature. There will be longer hikes, fire building skills, water purification, swimming, and activities based on plants, animals and geology. Good field skills will be fostered and teamwork practiced.
Explorers: Wednesdays, Session one: June 24-July 15 Session two: July 22-August 12

Wilderness Challenge: For wilderness buffs ages 11-17. Test your limits, build teamwork skills, challenge and strengthen your body, and have the time of your life. This course covers a variety of initiatives; from survival skills, outdoor adventure and navigation, to projects that foster positive social and personal character. One of our most popular courses!
*Wilderness Challenge includes one overnight at the end of each session. Please note price difference.*
Session one: June 25-July 16/17 Session two: July 23-August 13/14

Herbal Intensive for adults: ages 18+ In this new course offered through Great Hollow, we will learn the plants first hand. We will hike through the various beautiful habitats, learn practical herbal preparations for home and family use, and grow close to the land and the abundance it holds. We will also be learning useful simple botany and practice indexing and journaling. Medicinal and edible plants will be an emphasis. We will also indulge in the cooling waters and learn fire making. This promises to be an empowering course.
Herbal Intensive, Wednesdays, June 24-August 12.
Things to remember….
All summer programs will be a full day, 9am-3pm. They will take place entirely outdoors, so pack accordingly!
Lightweight supplies in a backpack are a must. Water (pre-frozen water bottles are great!), lunch, and rain jackets will be needed. Swimsuits can be worn under clothes, and a small towel if desired can be packed. Extra helpful things would be: a bandanna, sunscreen, sun hat, bug repellant, and campers steel or enamel cup. Good hiking or kayak shoes should be worn. Water shoes should be packed in the backpack.
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Snippets of Spring

Hello families! 

 

This season has begun quickly. Since I am out as an instructor for most of the program days, I have not been able to write here with the same length as before. But I have still captured some great moments with my little camera:

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Our Explorers wondered why this tree lost all of it's bark at once.

 

Learning self sufficiency; starting with fuel

Learning self sufficiency; starting with fuel

 

Old fashioned story time with the Scouts and Pioneers

Old fashioned story time with the Scouts and Pioneers

 

The Challenge group practicing non-verbal communication ~ Photo by Whendi Cook Broderick

The Challenge group practicing non-verbal communication ~ Photo by Whendi Cook Broderick

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Trout Lily

 

 

adrienne-happy

Hello everyone!  My name is Adrienne and I will be working for the Great Hollow Homeschool Program this spring and summer teaching the fascinating subject of Geology!  I am about to graduate from Cornell University with a Masters Degree in Geological Sciences.  I am just thrilled about spending the summer outside and imparting some of my knowledge about rocks and the workings of the earth to the students that I will have the privilege of working with.  I am very excited about the opportunity to both teach and learn in the wonderful environment of Great Hollow and look forward to meeting all of you sometime in the next few months.

Geology is a science that uses all of the five senses.  Looking at rocks provides us with colors and shapes by which to describe what we see.  Different rocks will sound differently when we scratch a nail against them or knock gently on their surfaces.  We touch rocks to describe how smooth they are and hence learn about their transport history (rocks that are rounded have traveled longer distances).  It is possible to distinguish fine-grained sandstone from lithified clay by putting a tiny bit of the rock dust in your mouth and feeling the texture (a grainy feel would mean sandstone while a smoother feeling would be clay).  And of course let’s not forget those particularly stinky rocks that have sulfur in them and are impossible for your nose to ignore!

The incorporation of physically observable ways to participate in Geology as a science makes the application of geologic principles intuitive and fun for children (and adults) of all ages.  The study of the rocks in our backyard is interesting in and of itself, but additionally, Geology also incorporates a larger understanding of the world around us when we ask challenging questions like, “Where did this rock come from and why is it different than the other ones in my backyard?” or “Why is this mineral so much bigger than those around it even though they are in the same rock?” 

These observations and questions combine into a fascinating science that encourages us to use our senses in conjunction with basic scientific methods to create a logical story and to express that story in basic terms that everyone can understand.  To describe rocks we use color, texture, size and percentages of different minerals in the sample.  In describing a large body of rock, we use the number of different rock types visible in the area in question, the angle those rock beds make to the horizon and the shape of the terrain, such as mountains vs. valleys.  All of these aspects of Geology combine to promote linear as well as creative thought processes and help young minds develop critical thinking skills. 

Looking forward to all of our adventures!

Sincerely,

Adrienne Long

Planting the Seeds of Knowledge

Planting the Seeds of Knowledge

Here is a sneak peak at a wonderful homespun addition to our Friday learning bank. I’m calling it a learning bank instead of a curriculum as it feels more abundant and ready than ‘curriculum’. I always have my eyes peeled as I go along my daily tasks, mining for gems to add to our bank, and this one was a strike of gold.

Written and hand-illustrated by fellow home-schooling, homesteading mother, Kristine Brown (aka Tansy) these monthly morsels are chock-full of fun and wisdom. Replete with facts, lore, projects, puzzles, recipes, and seasonal relevance, she has created the perfect activity booklet for kids (and grown ups!) who love plants and herbal healing. Our Jr. Naturalists will be using portions as a seamless supplement to botany/herb class.

Herbal roots is available (a new one each month) through Tansy’s etsy shop, LunaFarm Creations, and she updates us regularly through hr wonderful homestead blog, Dancing in a field of Tansy. Her formal website is Luna Herb Co. Feel free to order one for yourself or give as a gift to a friend!

(Click “Registration” in above navigation links to access the registration files, which also list costs)

feather-and-lichenAfter so much snow this year I think we are more ready than ever for Spring! Of course, we could get a noreaster at any moment now. 🙂 But none-the-less we are indeed gearing up for our Spring Homeschool semester. Wohoo! 

I wanted to announce to everyone the additions of TWO NEW PROGRAMS …. in response to our growing family needs and feedback. On Tuesday, we will be offering the EXPLORERS …. for ages 7-11. Folks who’s older children take the wilderness skills, you now have a option for your younger children as well.  Wednesday we will be offering PIONEERS 1 ….. for new or first year Pioneers. Many Pioneers have been here now for two or three years, and are ready to do new things and not repeat. It will give all of our Pioneers, both new and returning, a much richer curriculum. 

So…. our Spring will look like THIS:

(All days are from 9am – 3pm.)

TUESDAY

Wilderness Skills ages 12-17. *FULL*

This spring will be concentrated on Bow and Arrow skills…. *please be sure your child has theirs in advance.* Plenty of camouflage attire is recommended!

Habitat Explorers ages 7-11. *In Need of MORE participants

Lots of exploring! Hiking, collecting, games, identification, tracking, animal stalking, and creative learning. A bit of everything. I’d like this group to evolve  into a “green” group, taking on subjects and projects pertaining to conservation and sustainability. 

WEDNESDAY

Pioneers 1: CANCELED

 

THURSDAY

 
Wilderness Challenge  *FULL*

Ages: 11-17
Emphasis: Physical challenges, survival skills and first aid, teamwork initiatives, navigation, wild food and water, tracking, shelters. Our most physically demanding program.
 
Scouts  *Still room
Ages: 7-9
Emphasis: Foundational nature skills, habitats, weather, storytelling, history,  plant and animal studies, eco-games, nature projects, positive social skills, and more
 
Pioneers 2   *FULL
Ages 9-12
Emphasis: Intermediate Nature skills and discovery; building projects, eco-games, teamwork, camouflage, tracking, awareness skills, fire building, traditions.
 
FRIDAY
 
Micro-Scouts    *Still room
Ages 4-6
Emphasis: Observations, eco-games, nature art, collecting and sorting, examining and inquiry, hiking, weather, story, animals and plants, respect.
 
Jr. Naturalist    *FULL
Ages 7-14
Emphasis: Observational skills, botany and herbal medicine making, animal/nature symbiosis, eco-games, nature journals, tracking, birdwatching, conservation, and some primitive skills.
  

OK that’s the nutshell! Don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions.

Click on the registration link up top for the documents.

Be well – Ananda